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Jesus the Jewish Theologian by Brad H. Young

Jesus the Jewish Theologian establishes Jesus firmly within the context of first century Judaism and shows how understanding Jesus’ Jewishness is crucial for interpreting the New Testament and for understanding the nature of Christian faith.

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The Lost World of Adam and Eve by John H. Walton

Following his groundbreaking Lost World of Genesis One, John Walton explores the ancient Near Eastern context of Genesis 2–3, creating space for a faithful reading of Scripture along with full engagement with science for a new way forward in the human origins debate. As a bonus, an illuminating excursus by N. T. Wright places Adam in the implied narrative of Paul’s theology. The Lost World of Adam and Eve will be required reading for anyone seeking to understand this foundational text historically and theologically, and wondering how to view it alongside contemporary understandings of human origins.

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The Lost World of Genesis One by John H. Walton

In this astute mix of cultural critique and biblical studies, John H. Walton presents and defends twenty propositions supporting a literary and theological understanding of Genesis 1 within the context of the ancient Near Eastern world and unpacks its implications for our modern scientific understanding of origins. Ideal for students, professors, pastors and lay readers with an interest in the intelligent design controversy and creation-evolution debates, Walton’s thoughtful analysis unpacks seldom appreciated aspects of the biblical text and sets Bible-believing scientists free to investigate the question of origins.

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Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament by John H. Walton

Walton surveys the literature of the ancient Near East and introduces the reader to a variety of beliefs about God, religion, and the world. In helpful sidebars, he provides examples of how such studies can bring insight to the interpretation of specific Old Testament passages.

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Kingdom Prologue by Meredith G. Kline (Author)

As intimated by the subtitle, Genesis Foundations for a Covenantal Worldview, the immediate literary focus of this study is the book of Genesis and its account of the formative ages in the eschatological movement of the kingdom of God from creation to consummation.

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Ezekiel in Context by Brian Neil Peterson (Author)

One of the most perplexing and misunderstood books of the Bible, Ezekiel has left many scholars and exegetes scratching their heads regarding its message, coherency, and interpretation. Brian Peterson’s look at the book of Ezekiel as a unified whole set within an exilic context helps explain some of the more difficult symbolic aspects in the book and makes Ezekiel as a whole more intelligible

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The JPS Torah Commentary: Deuteronomy by Dr. Jeffrey H. Tigay (Author)

The JPS Torah Commentary contains in every page the complete traditional Hebrew text, with cantillation notes, the JPS translation of the Holy Scriptures, aliyot breaks, Masoretic notes, and commentary by a distinguished Hebrew Bible scholar, integrating classical and modern sources. Each volume also contains supplementary essays that elaborate upon key words and themes, a glossary of commentators and sources, extensive bibliographic notes, and maps.

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Honor and Shame in the Gospel of Matthew by Jerome H. Neyrey

Jerome Neyrey clarifies what praise, honor, and glory meant to Matthew and his audience. He examines the traditional literary forms for bestowing such praise and the conventional grounds for awarding honor and praise in Matthew’s world.

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Honor and Shame: Unlocking the Door by Roland Muller

In this book, Roland Muller removes the mystique from shame-based cultures. Using the Bible, he introduces us to honor, shame, and fear-based cultures, illustrating their development over the years and demonstrating their influence on our understanding of.

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Social World of the New Testament, The: Insights and Models by Jerome H. Neyrey

The Social World of the New Testament: Insights and Models surveys essential contributions made by leading scholars of the social scientific approach to New Testament studies. Included are topics vital to the social scientific interpretation of the New Testament.

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Holiness to the Lord: A Guide to the Exposition of the Book of Leviticus by Allen P. Ross

Holiness to the Lord is every expositor’s indispensable guide for interpreting the Law for the church and for elucidating Leviticus in practical, biblical messages about worship, sanctification, and obedience.

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Leviticus 23-27 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) by Jacob Milgrom

Although at first glance Leviticus seems far removed from the modern-day world, Milgrom’s thoughtful and provocative comments and notes reveal its enduring relevance to contemporary society.”Leviticus 23-27″ brings us to the climactic end of the book and its revolutionary innovations, among which are the evolution of the festival calendar with its emphasis on folk traditions, and the jubilee, the priestly answer to the socio-economic problems of their time.With English translations that convey the nuance and power of the original Hebrew, this trilogy will take its place alongside the best of the “Anchor Bible Commentaries”.

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Everyday Law in Biblical Israel: An Introduction by Raymond Westbrook

Raymond Westbrook and Bruce Wells examine Old Testament legal materials that illustrate how ancient Israelites settled their grievances. This textbook is unique in exploring these legal materials as they relate to the issues of everyday life–family, property, contracts, and crimes–and providing readers with a broad understanding of their ancient legal and social foundations.

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Paul, Women, and Wives: Marriage and Women’s Ministry in the Letters of Paul by Craig S. Keener

Paul’s letters stand at the center of the dispute over women, the church, and the home, with each side championing passages from the Apostle. Now, in a challenging new attempt to wrestle with these thorny texts, Craig Keener delves as deeply into the world of Paul and the apostles as anyone thus far. Acknowledging that we must take the biblical text seriously, and recognizing that Paul’s letters arose in a specific time and place for a specific purpose, Keener mines the historical, lexical, cultural, and exegetical details behind Paul’s words about women in the home and ministry to give us one of the most insightful expositions of the key Pauline passages in years.

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Roman Wives, Roman Widows: The Appearance of New Women and the Pauline Communities by Bruce W. Wint

Using his extensive knowledge both of the Graeco-Roman world and of the New Testament writings, Bruce Winter shows how changing social mores among women impacted the Pauline communities. This helps to explain the controversial texts on marriage veils in 1 Corinthians, instructions in 1 Timothy regarding dress code and the activities of young widows, and exhortations in Titus for older women to call new wives “back to their senses” regarding their marriage and family responsibilities. Based on a close investigation of neglected literary and archaeological evidence, “Roman Wives, Roman Widows” makes groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of first-century women, including their participation in public life as lawyers, magistrates, and political figures, which in turn affected women’s ministry in the Pauline communities.

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Hidden Riches: A Sourcebook for the Comparative Study of the Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near East by

This study considers the historical, cultural, and literary significance of some of the most important Ancient Near East (ANE) texts that illuminate the Hebrew Bible. Christopher B. Hays provides primary texts from the Ancient Near East with a comparison to literature of the Hebrew Bible to demonstrate how Israel’s Scriptures not only draw from these ancient contexts but also reshape them in a unique way.

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Pomegranates and Golden Bells: Studies in Biblical, Jewish, and Near Eastern Ritual, Law and Litera

Colleagues, students, and friends honor Professor Milgrom by celebrating his contributions to biblical and Near Eastern scholarship with special emphasis on his primary areas of expertise. The first section of the book, Ritual, Law, and Their Sources, contains thirty-five essays on cultic and legal issues found in the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint, and texts from Qumran. The second section, Other Literary, Historical, and Linguistic Studies, includes twenty-four essays, primarily dealing with interpretive issues in the Hebrew Bible.

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God at Sinai by Jeffrey J. Niehaus

The basis of all biblical study is that God has revealed himself, not only through the Word, but in various ways in various times and places. These self-disclosures are called theophanies. The pivotal theophany in Old Testament times was God’s revelation to Moses on Mount Sinai. So significant is this theophany in terms of God’s covenant with his people and his progressive revelation that author Jeffrey J. Niehaus justifiably employs the term “Sinai theology” to convey his theme. This book explores the meaning of this theophany throughout the Old Testament — pre-Sinai, post-Sinai (especially the prophets), and the Psalms — and its significance for the New Testament. It also examines parallels in ancient Near Eastern traditions.

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Kingdom through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants by Peter J. Gentry

The disciplines of biblical and systematic theology join forces to investigate anew the biblical covenants and the implications of such a study for conclusions in systematic theology.

By incorporating the latest available research from the ancient Near East and examining implications of their work for Christology, ecclesiology, eschatology, and hermeneutics—Biblical scholar Peter Gentry and systematic theologian Stephen Wellum present a thoughtful and viable alternative to both covenant theology and dispensationalism.

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Nuevo Testamento Judio by David H. Stern

Translated by David H. Stern Uses neutral terms and Hebrew names Highlights Jewish features and Jewish references Corrects mistranslations from an anti-Jewish theological bias.

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Ancient Israelite Literature in its Cultural Context by John H. Walton

This unique book surveys within the various literary genres the parallels between the Bible and the literature of the ancient Near East. Each section begins with a survey of the available ancient literature, continues with a discussion of the literature, and concludes with a discussion of cases of alleged borrowing. The genres covered are – cosmology – laws – historical literature – wisdom literature – apocalyptic literature – personal archives and epics – covenants and treaties – hymns, prayers, and incantations – prophetic literature

 

Para el beneficio de el lector estas referencias han sido enlazadas a otra página, que abrirá en una ventanilla nueva, para que puedan adquirir las mismas según la disponibilidad del proveedor.

  1. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament by John H. Walton
  2. Kingdom Prologue by Meredith G. Kline
  3. Ezekiel in Context by Brian Neil Peterson (Author)
  4. The JPS Torah Commentary: Deuteronomy by Dr. Jeffrey H. Tigay
  5. Honor and Shame in the Gospel of Matthew by Jerome H. Neyrey
  6. Honor and Shame: Unlocking the Door by Roland Muller
  7. Social World of the New Testament, The: Insights and Models by Jerome H. Neyrey
  8. Holiness to the Lord by Allen P. Ross
  9. Leviticus 23-27 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) by Jacob Milgrom
  10. Everyday Law in Biblical Israel: An Introduction by Raymond Westbrook
  11. Paul, Women, and Wives by Craig S. Keener
  12. Roman Wives, Roman Widows by Bruce W. Winter
  13. Pomegranates and Golden Bells by Wright, David Noel Freedman, Avi Hurvitz
  14. God at Sinai by Jeffrey J. Niehaus
  15. Kingdom through Covenant by Peter J. Gentry (Author), Stephen J. Wellum (Author)
  16. Nuevo Testamento Judio by David H. Stern
  17. Ancient Israelite Literature in its Cultural Context by John H. Walton
  18. The Lost World of Adam and Eve by John H. Walton
  19. The Lost World of Genesis One by John H. Walton
  20. Jesus the Jewish Theologian by Brad H. Young